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Portland Real Estate

Vote for your favorite Portland building project

The Portland Business Journal has picked 20 area projects that “exemplify excellence in construction and real estate development.” The projects range from luxurious condos to shelter for the homeless and also include schools, a soccer arena and a convention center. The owners, developers, architects and builders will be honored Nov. 21 at the PBJ’s CRE Transformer Awards event at the Sentinel Hotel.

Here’s a slideshow of all of the nominated buildings. (The Redd has my vote in case you were wondering.)

(And speaking of the PBJ, Jon Bell has left the building for other pastures. His “5 things” column is going to be missed!) 

 

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Portland Real Estate

Portland’s oldest building (finally) getting restored

After decades of false starts and horrible remodeling work, Portland’s oldest commercial building is finally getting restored to its former glory.

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Emerick Architects announced on its Facebook page that the contractor,  Bremik Construction, has begun demolition on the facade (currently a boxed horror show) of the Hallock & McMillen building.

 So long, ugly facade.  Source.
So long, ugly facade. Source.

Built in 1857, the building has miraculously survived in the neighborhood while most of its cast-iron neighbors met the wrecking ball years ago to be replaced and scarred by parking lots and faceless 80s and 90s office-building schlock.

The building will be “artfully crafted to match the original details, these cast iron pieces will soon find their home on SW Naito Parkway.”

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Portland Real Estate

Oregon endangered places; Towne Crier campaign reset; Portland’s most transformative buildings of 2018

Towne Crier campaign reset
I wrote about the Town Crier a couple month’s back and now it looks like they’ve reset their campaign into multiple phases. So, they’re re-launching the campaign under The Treasury, a community-based coffee shop within the Towne Crier building. From their NextSeed page:

Highlighting and focusing on The Treasury in our NextSeed campaign allows our team to strategically begin to bring our target market to our space while the other phases are being permitted and built out. We are confident that this pivot will enhance our business model and structure us for success in the future!

 One of the many endangered places, The Waldron Brothers’ Drugstore is the oldest intact commercial building in The Dalles and constructed during the Civil War of local stone.
One of the many endangered places, The Waldron Brothers’ Drugstore is the oldest intact commercial building in The Dalles and constructed during the Civil War of local stone. Source. 

Restore Oregon most endangered spaces for 2019
Since 2011, Restore Oregon has delivered one of the most successful preservation programs in the state: Oregon’s Most Endangered Places. Oregon’s Most Endangered Places program works to raise public awareness of the cultural value of these places, provides direct consultation, distributes seed grants, advocates for pro-preservation public policy, and helps owners leverage additional grants and private investment to support their restoration. Here’s the list for 2019.

What building transformed Portland in 2018?
The Portland Business Journal is looking for the most-transformative commercial real estate project of 2018. Go forth and vote!

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Portland Real Estate

Voodoo Doughnut on the move (maybe); Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge; nature in the city

Voodoo Doughnut coming to Milwaukie/Oak Grove?
That’s the rumor on the street. The Starbucks on McLoughlin (14620 SE McLoughlin Blvd. to be exact) is moving across the street making room for a huge space that includes the long-ago vacated Pizza Schmizza. And that’s where the new Voodoo would (apparently) go. We’re not convinced.

 Doughnuts, booze and dry cleaning.  Source.
Doughnuts, booze and dry cleaning.

The story behind Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge
One of our fave places in Portland has a great story on its creation (involving some guerrilla action). Read the whole story here.

“…armed with a bottle of Jim Beam bourbon (we) proceeded to nail up the signs around the wetland perimeter, thereby establishing, by fiat, that we unilaterally declared the city’s first urban wildlife refuge…”

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Speaking of nature in the city…

Portland metro is blessed with the green, right? Rivers, trees, birds. And, though not in Portland, a new study says that being near nature and trees lessens depression and crime. And to prove it, researchers added greenery to city vacant lots and saw people using them more and crime declining. Nature for the win.

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Portland Real Estate

The Redd ready; Portland Plaza facelift; O’Bryant Square closed until …2023?

Here’s a roundup of building, design and development news around Portland.

The Redd ready to open
The Redd by Ecotrust will take up two city blocks and function as an “urban ecosystem for the regional food economy.”  In its final phase of construction, it’s expected to open for full operation by the end of the year.  Here’s a feature from Lost Oregon a couple years back on its history and vision.

 The red Redd.  Source.  
The red Redd. Source.  

The Portland Plaza gets a facelift
The Portland Plaza just finished its 10-year, $10 million renovation and Brian Libby from Portland Architecture has an in-depth look. 

When it was completed in 1973, just three years after the Keller Fountain (known then as the Forecourt Fountain), the idea of contemporary or luxury living in Portland, especially in a tower, was new.

 Portland Plaza and Lawrence Halprin's Keller Fountain put on a show via a postcard.
Portland Plaza and Lawrence Halprin’s Keller Fountain put on a show via a postcard.

O’Bryant Square closed until …2023?
The DJC is reporting that the redevelopment of downtown Portland’s O’Bryant Square may take until 2023. The public space has been shuttered since March due to structural issues. The fence is so welcoming, too.

 O'Bryant Square in better times, circa 1976.
O’Bryant Square in better times, circa 1976.

Urban walking isn’t just good for the soul. It could save humanity
That’s not my headline —it’s from the Guardian, and it’s a good one. The nugget: walking around cities is good for your health and it’s good for the businesses that inhabit downtowns. You just don’t see the details when you’re driving. Case in point: Hopping off the Orange Line at PSU yesterday to watch the Timbers (win, whew), we strolled up Jefferson to the Goose Hollow Inn for a pre-match beer. The furthest I’d been up Jefferson was OHS, but as we walked I was surprised that I’d never been on this stretch before. Just when you think you’ve seen every block in downtown.

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Portland Real Estate

Event amplification: My Existential Crisis and Other Random Acts | Martha Schwartz

You might have already seen this event being promoted but just in case. 

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Portland Design Events is presenting Martha Schwartz of Martha Schwartz Partners (MSP)—a leading international design practice whose work focuses on activating and regenerating urban sites and city centers—with a two-part presentation on 9/13. 

The first part will be about the work of Martha Schwartz Partners that spans from the very early installation works to the most recent work being done by the practice. The work will show an evolution of scale and approach to design.

The second part of the presentation will be sharing Schwartz’s concerns about climate change and the conflicts this knowledge has brought which has resulted in the re-evaluation of her own priorities as a professional. Here’s her take: 

I’m in a transition now as I am beginning to learn more about climate change and how we, as a practice, might fundamentally change our approach to design. As a teacher, my goals have shifted to teaching students how we, as landscape architects, can respond meaningfully to climate change.

I’m not a designer or an architect but this sounds interesting for everyone that cares about how our cities and spaces are going to be designed. Go here to sign up!

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Portland Real Estate

On display: Vintage 1970s Douglas Fir model of downtown Portland

This totally escaped my radar but there’s a vintage 1970s Douglas Fir model of downtown Portland on display as part of Converge 45’s installation of Ann Hamilton’s, Habitus, at Centennial Mill through September 16.

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In the early days of Portland’s downtown renaissance, Portland planners created a civic ritual for thinking about new development: including this crafted Douglas fir model of the city. For years, as a requirement of design review, developers and architects were required to bring any proposed downtown building, scaled in white cardboard, and place in the city model.

Randy Gragg is currently working on an exhibit idea to combine it with new “models” of other districts of the city—current or aspired to—for Design Week Portland 2019.

If you’re not busy 8/28 or 8/30, Gragg will also be presenting some ideas to “inspire community groups, developers, designers and leaders to think about the larger context of their districts and their city.”

Here’s a quick schedule

August 28: 5:30-7 pm, Tuesday, August 28—Short talk at 6

August 30: Noon-1:30 pm—Short talk at 12:30

Where: Centennial Mills, NW Naito Parkway & NW 9th Avenue (Look for the signs leading to Converge 45 and Habitus)

Please RSVP: randygraggprojects@gmail.com

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Portland Real Estate

A stroll through Portland’s West End

James Cook, director of retail research in the Americas for JLL, has an interesting podcast called Where We Buy, “a show about the things we buy and the places we buy them.”

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In his most recent episode he explores Portland’s West End with Jonathan Ledesma, a partner with developer Project^. They talk about the challenges, opportunities and the transformation of the West End through adaptive reuse.

 Union Way: The shops may have changed since its opening,  but the design still shines. 
Union Way: The shops may have changed, but the design still shines. 

The two projects highlighted include Blackbox, a retail and creative space in a historic brick building, and Union Way, the shopping alley that connects two streets through two former night clubs. I’m probably not the target shopping audience for Union Way but I still love its aesthetics, the vibe, the design (those flush-mounted floor lights…), and the fact that it magically empties out to Powell’s (how convenient). It’s the perfect example of a building being reborn as a fun and useful space.

Grab a beverage and give the episodes a listen.

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Portland Real Estate

Milwaukie Bay Park is back

OK, it really never went away but to the casual observer nothing much has been going on since the initial grand opening three years ago. Since then, the grass has yellowed and the geese have pretty much been chased away. Now, it’s ready for the next steps: the final design phase.

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It’s been a piecemeal process.  The Klein Point Overlook was constructed (it offers a nice vantage point where Johnson Creek meets the Willamette), then a new boat dock and boat trailer parking were constructed, then restroom facilities built, and finally a connection to the Trolley Trail. Next up: A bank restoration project will begin this year, and even more park improvements will soon be planned for construction in 2020.

The survey asks : “Pick 2 photos that show how you would like artistic elements, history, and local character to be incorporated into the park.” Answer: More techno!

Construction on final park improvements is expected to begin by summer 2020, but first, the city of Milwaukie is looking for community feedback.

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Portland Real Estate

JLL Completes Sale of Indigo @ Twelve | West

Hot of the press (release):

JLL’s Capital Markets experts today announced the sale of Indigo @ Twelve | West, a mixed-use property in the vibrant West End district of Portland, on behalf of an ownership group represented by Gerding Edlen and Downtown Development Group.

Developed in 2009 by Gerding Edlen and designed by ZGF Architects, this dynamic mixed-use building offers 273 modern apartments, 85,000 square feet of creative office, 321 underground parking stalls, and curated, street level retail under one green roof. The anchor of the West End neighborhood, with its prominent, skyline-defining wind turbines, and incomparable multifamily amenities, Indigo is an iconic property that has consistently performed at the top of the Portland market.

The transaction was conducted through the combined efforts of the JLL Northwest Capital Markets team. The commercial side was lead by JLL Managing Directors Buzz Ellis and Paige Morgan, and Vice President Adam Taylor, while Senior Vice President Mark Washington and Managing Directors David Young and Corey Marx led the multifamily team.