Restore Oregon announces most endangered buildings for 2020

The Mayo House, constructed in 1895, is a Queen Anne Cottage with a complex history. Source. 

Restore Oregon has unveiled its list of Oregon’s Most Endangered Places for 2020. From their website:

Nominated from people and organizations across the state, Oregon’s Most Endangered Places list sheds light on important examples of our state’s heritage that are at risk of destruction or irreparable damage. The 2020 list includes endangered places from communities that for too long have been underserved–that embody Oregon’s diverse cultural heritage and require concerted efforts to be retained and passed forward.

I’m especially excited about the Mayo House:

The Mayo House now sits on the property, representing an opportunity to repair a grave injustice. The Davises envision the Mayo House with a multipurpose future by creating a hub for African American arts, history, and culture.

 

Vote for your favorite Portland building project

The Portland Business Journal has picked 20 area projects that “exemplify excellence in construction and real estate development.” The projects range from luxurious condos to shelter for the homeless and also include schools, a soccer arena and a convention center. The owners, developers, architects and builders will be honored Nov. 21 at the PBJ’s CRE Transformer Awards event at the Sentinel Hotel.

Here’s a slideshow of all of the nominated buildings. (The Redd has my vote in case you were wondering.)

(And speaking of the PBJ, Jon Bell has left the building for other pastures. His “5 things” column is going to be missed!) 

 

A look at Portland’s oldest neighborhood; Widmer closes; Saving the Mayo house

Portland’s North End
If you’re not reading Street Roots, buy a copy from any of its vendors around town. Not only do they report on homeless (and other) issues they do a great job doing it. Proof: this piece on the history of Old Town and how it’s transformed through the years. It’s written by Doug Kenck-Crispin, co-producer of the podcast Kick Ass Oregon History so you know it’s solid.

Widmer closes
Some of us were surprised, others not so much: Widmer has shut its N. Russell pub. In 2017, they stopped serving food at the same location. The venerable brewer will still produce beers, you just can’t go to its pub to drink them.

 Widmer, before it was Widmer. Source.

Mayo house saved
What a great story: Local artist saves historic home, will move it to where the family’s long-lost apartment once stood and will renovate it —and open it to the public  “where historians, artists and members of the black community can preserve and create culture.”