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Portland Real Estate

Milwaukie Bay Park is back

OK, it really never went away but to the casual observer nothing much has been going on since the initial grand opening three years ago. Since then, the grass has yellowed and the geese have pretty much been chased away. Now, it’s ready for the next steps: the final design phase.

  Source. 

It’s been a piecemeal process.  The Klein Point Overlook was constructed (it offers a nice vantage point where Johnson Creek meets the Willamette), then a new boat dock and boat trailer parking were constructed, then restroom facilities built, and finally a connection to the Trolley Trail. Next up: A bank restoration project will begin this year, and even more park improvements will soon be planned for construction in 2020.

The survey asks : “Pick 2 photos that show how you would like artistic elements, history, and local character to be incorporated into the park.” Answer: More techno!

Construction on final park improvements is expected to begin by summer 2020, but first, the city of Milwaukie is looking for community feedback.

Categories
Portland Real Estate

Indoor skatepark coming to Milwaukie?

It appears so.

From their website:

We are very excited to announce that after a very long search with many ups and downs we have found a space and signed a lease in Milwaukie just outside of SE Portland! At over 5000 sq feet with a party room in the back, its the perfect space for a new indoor park and we can’t wait to see you there!

They’ll be doing a pre-sale to help fund the building of the park, with the opportunity to buy sessions and memberships at a deep discount. Looks like they’re opening at Wichita Town Center on King next to Urban Warrior. 

Stronger Skatepark says it will “provide a safe and clean space for people of all ages and abilities to engage in skateboarding and the local community.” They’ll also offer open skate times, camps, lessons, parties and other events.

Cool. Check out their website for more info.

Categories
Portland Real Estate

12 Portland skyscrapers that changed Portland; Small-scale manufacturing in Central Eastside; ‘Booming’ South Downtown Milwaukie

The word skyscraper might be a stretch, regardless, this piece goes deep (or is that high?) on 12 Portland skyscrapers that changed the city for good (and bad).  I don’t normally recommend reading the comments from OregonLive but there’s a lively discussion on buildings missed (of course there’s the old-timer lamenting how much downtown has changed since—fill in blank of the decade when they peaked/moved here). Great pics throughout, too. I love it when the Oregonian dives into its pic morgue. And for the record, where’s the Weatherly?

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Portland Small-Scale Manufacturing
White papers don’t exactly instill a sense of excitement but this one is pretty fascinating. It’s called The State of Urban Manufacturing Portland City Snapshot. Stay with me.

In a nutshell, the white paper helps to try and understand what the small-batch manufacturing sector looks like, who its “entrepreneurs and employees are, and what cities can do to help these firms thrive and grow into larger jobs generators, and retain them within the urban core.”

One of the cities that the The Urban Manufacturing Alliance profiled is Portland. And one of the key takeaways I got (and, sure, I’m cherry-picking) is that manufacturing job growth between 2010 and 2016 was most evident in the Central Eastside district, where it increased by 30 percent. I’m intrigued by small-scale manufacturing and how individuals and companies are making stuff, not outside of cities, but right in the middle in places like the Central Eastside.

The downside?

Affordable space represents the most urgent challenge facing manufacturers in Portland today, especially smaller, fast-growing companies that prefer to accommodate their expansions within city limits.

  Source.
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Milwaukie has a lot going in South Downtown
And, they’ve got a new website to prove it. South Downtown wasn’t even a thing like 5 years ago. And now? Here’s some of what’s going to be completed (whoa?) by 2019-2020.

  • Axletree apartments, a new five-story, mixed-use development.
  • Kronberg Park Multi-Use Walkway
  • Coho Point at Kellogg Creek, an opportunity site for a 5-story mixed-use building.
  • A new high school
  • A new space for the Milwaukie Farmer’s Market

That’s just some of the projects.

 The future site of Coho Landing in South Downtown Milwaukie. The current building will be demolished.  Source. 
The future site of Coho Landing in South Downtown Milwaukie. The current building will be demolished. Source. 

Small-scale on Division
Took a stroll down Division in today (as I do every couple of years) and was— as usual—blown away by the changes. I like that these kind of workhouse buildings (see pic) are still around. Two-story, retail on bottom, housing on top. Could this even get built anymore? Does code even allow that?

 Small-scale still exists along Division (surrounded by new construction). 
Small-scale still exists along Division (surrounded by new construction). 
Categories
Portland Real Estate

Brick buildings: cute, but deadly; Milwaukie growth spurt; demolition porn; welcome to South Portland

URM buildings
Historical brick buildings, also known as unreinforced masonry buildings or URMs, “make up nine percent of the buildings in Portland. Though charming, they’re the most dangerous places to be in or near during an earthquake” (which can happen tomorrow or 100 years from now). So, what’s Portland going to do? Tear them all down? Make owners pay a bajillion dollars to reinforce? Replace them with boring, vanilla condos? Glad I’m not the one making decisions around here.

 Interesting, leaky roof. Presuming this one's coming down when sold.  Source. 
Interesting, leaky roof. Presuming this one’s coming down when sold. 

Downtown Milwaukie moves
Downtown Milwaukie (or DTM—too soon?) is on the cusp of a huge building boom. There’s new construction ready to start for the Axletree (110 units) and the rumor of a brewery on the bottom floor. Next door Coho Point at Kellogg Creek, a five-story mixed-use project is in the works.  And if you cross McLoughlin, there’s an interesting piece of property for sale in one of the few commercially zoned properties within the area. My guess is a tear-down. The roof leaks, it looks like it’s going to collapse, it’s a unique style. Watching this one for sure.

 The Axletree in downtown Milwaukie.  Source. 
The Axletree in downtown Milwaukie. Source. 

Demolition porn
Portland DJC posted a photo essay of demolition porn last week. The old Portland Music Co. building is a goner. Its replacement will be a “six-story, cross-laminated-timber building.” (Portland Music Co. moved down to Oak Grove on McLoughlin, by the way.)

Kyle Berens uses an excavator to support the building as the demolition of the structure begins.
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Welcome to ‘South Portland’ again
Portland is moving closer to changing mailing addresses for nearly 10,000 businesses and homes in what would be the most significant change to the city’s address book since the Great Depression.  For some of you in Southwest, you will now be in South Portland.