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Portland Real Estate

The Redd ready; Portland Plaza facelift; O’Bryant Square closed until …2023?

Here’s a roundup of building, design and development news around Portland.

The Redd ready to open
The Redd by Ecotrust will take up two city blocks and function as an “urban ecosystem for the regional food economy.”  In its final phase of construction, it’s expected to open for full operation by the end of the year.  Here’s a feature from Lost Oregon a couple years back on its history and vision.

 The red Redd.  Source.  
The red Redd. Source.  

The Portland Plaza gets a facelift
The Portland Plaza just finished its 10-year, $10 million renovation and Brian Libby from Portland Architecture has an in-depth look. 

When it was completed in 1973, just three years after the Keller Fountain (known then as the Forecourt Fountain), the idea of contemporary or luxury living in Portland, especially in a tower, was new.

 Portland Plaza and Lawrence Halprin's Keller Fountain put on a show via a postcard.
Portland Plaza and Lawrence Halprin’s Keller Fountain put on a show via a postcard.

O’Bryant Square closed until …2023?
The DJC is reporting that the redevelopment of downtown Portland’s O’Bryant Square may take until 2023. The public space has been shuttered since March due to structural issues. The fence is so welcoming, too.

 O'Bryant Square in better times, circa 1976.
O’Bryant Square in better times, circa 1976.

Urban walking isn’t just good for the soul. It could save humanity
That’s not my headline —it’s from the Guardian, and it’s a good one. The nugget: walking around cities is good for your health and it’s good for the businesses that inhabit downtowns. You just don’t see the details when you’re driving. Case in point: Hopping off the Orange Line at PSU yesterday to watch the Timbers (win, whew), we strolled up Jefferson to the Goose Hollow Inn for a pre-match beer. The furthest I’d been up Jefferson was OHS, but as we walked I was surprised that I’d never been on this stretch before. Just when you think you’ve seen every block in downtown.

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Portland Real Estate

On display: Vintage 1970s Douglas Fir model of downtown Portland

This totally escaped my radar but there’s a vintage 1970s Douglas Fir model of downtown Portland on display as part of Converge 45’s installation of Ann Hamilton’s, Habitus, at Centennial Mill through September 16.

  Source. 

In the early days of Portland’s downtown renaissance, Portland planners created a civic ritual for thinking about new development: including this crafted Douglas fir model of the city. For years, as a requirement of design review, developers and architects were required to bring any proposed downtown building, scaled in white cardboard, and place in the city model.

Randy Gragg is currently working on an exhibit idea to combine it with new “models” of other districts of the city—current or aspired to—for Design Week Portland 2019.

If you’re not busy 8/28 or 8/30, Gragg will also be presenting some ideas to “inspire community groups, developers, designers and leaders to think about the larger context of their districts and their city.”

Here’s a quick schedule

August 28: 5:30-7 pm, Tuesday, August 28—Short talk at 6

August 30: Noon-1:30 pm—Short talk at 12:30

Where: Centennial Mills, NW Naito Parkway & NW 9th Avenue (Look for the signs leading to Converge 45 and Habitus)

Please RSVP: randygraggprojects@gmail.com

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Portland Real Estate

A stroll through Portland’s West End

James Cook, director of retail research in the Americas for JLL, has an interesting podcast called Where We Buy, “a show about the things we buy and the places we buy them.”

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In his most recent episode he explores Portland’s West End with Jonathan Ledesma, a partner with developer Project^. They talk about the challenges, opportunities and the transformation of the West End through adaptive reuse.

 Union Way: The shops may have changed since its opening,  but the design still shines. 
Union Way: The shops may have changed, but the design still shines. 

The two projects highlighted include Blackbox, a retail and creative space in a historic brick building, and Union Way, the shopping alley that connects two streets through two former night clubs. I’m probably not the target shopping audience for Union Way but I still love its aesthetics, the vibe, the design (those flush-mounted floor lights…), and the fact that it magically empties out to Powell’s (how convenient). It’s the perfect example of a building being reborn as a fun and useful space.

Grab a beverage and give the episodes a listen.

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Portland Real Estate

JLL Completes Sale of Indigo @ Twelve | West

Hot of the press (release):

JLL’s Capital Markets experts today announced the sale of Indigo @ Twelve | West, a mixed-use property in the vibrant West End district of Portland, on behalf of an ownership group represented by Gerding Edlen and Downtown Development Group.

Developed in 2009 by Gerding Edlen and designed by ZGF Architects, this dynamic mixed-use building offers 273 modern apartments, 85,000 square feet of creative office, 321 underground parking stalls, and curated, street level retail under one green roof. The anchor of the West End neighborhood, with its prominent, skyline-defining wind turbines, and incomparable multifamily amenities, Indigo is an iconic property that has consistently performed at the top of the Portland market.

The transaction was conducted through the combined efforts of the JLL Northwest Capital Markets team. The commercial side was lead by JLL Managing Directors Buzz Ellis and Paige Morgan, and Vice President Adam Taylor, while Senior Vice President Mark Washington and Managing Directors David Young and Corey Marx led the multifamily team.

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Portland Real Estate

New timber building breaks ground in Central Eastside

Beam Development and Urban Development + Partners (UD+P) continue to transform the Central Eastside with District Office, a six-story mass timber creative office building located at 525 SE MLK Blvd. With construction underway, the project features ground floor retail, open office floorplates, generous ceiling heights and innovative, double-height indoor/outdoor deck spaces.

 The mass timber project is underway just as another timber building was scrapped. 
The mass timber project is underway just as another timber building was scrapped. 

Hacker Architects designed the project and will be moving its headquarters to the top floor of District Office upon completion in late 2019 with Andersen Construction building the project and JLL leading the leasing efforts.

“As one of the first development companies to recognize the potential of the Central Eastside and help pioneer its transformation, we anticipate District Office will serve as a catalyst for the revitalization of the emerging Grand/Stark corridor,” said Beam Development Principal Jonathan Malsin.

With 72,000 square feet of office space, District Office offers an extensive list of best in class amenities such as highly efficient mechanical systems, indoor / outdoor lounge space with operable windows and abundant natural light.  The innovative design includes a 40’ column-to-window span to maximize floor plan flexibility and allows for efficient open or private office layouts. In addition, the building will be built with cross-laminated timber sourced in Oregon, which is a highly durable and resilient type of mass timber construction that achieves larger spans, beautiful exposed structure, lower environmental impact and benefits the rural Oregon economy.

“This project prioritizes year-round usable office space that feels connected to the outdoors,” said UD+P Principal Eric Cress.“ With the massive windows and location in the heart of the Central Eastside, District Office is going to be an outstanding place to work.”

The new space will add 9,500 rentable square feet of ground-floor retail space, encompassing dining and retail, to the district to provide building tenants and the community with social and recreational features amongst the professional environment. District Office also offers onsite parking, showers and lockers, and bike parking for its users.

“The Central Eastside continues to see an amazing progression of placemaking for some of Portland’s most dynamic businesses,” said JLL Managing Director Jake Lancaster.

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Portland Real Estate

Zidell Yards statement on next steps, wood skyscraper DOA, Portland Building…leggings?

More on Zidell Yards
Jay Zidell, president of ZRZ Realty Company, released a statement on their site today. Here’s a blurb from it:

After lengthy negotiations with the City of Portland, we’ve decided to mutually terminate the Development Agreement for Zidell Yards.

It comes down to two simple things: the cost of public infrastructure and the need to secure outside funding. The public infrastructure that would have been a part of Zidell Yards included ten acres of new public parks and Greenway, new public docks and a publicly accessible beach as well as the extension of Bond Avenue and significant investments in affordable housing.

We were happy to contribute as much as we could to these projects, but we compete for financing with projects across the city and nation. Zidell Yards could not bear the sizable additional infrastructure costs the City was requesting and still generate the market returns needed to secure outside funding.

  Source.
Source. 

Central Eastside gets (yet) another new tenant
After nearly 10 years on Mississippi Avenue, Animal Traffic is relocating to the Central Eastside. Well known for their vintage clothes, Animal Traffic will occupy a 2.465 SF space with a 1,650 SF showroom in the newly renovated Taylor Works Building at 134 SE Taylor Street. Alongside their highly curated clothing selection will be a new shoe lounge. Animal Traffic will be an exclusive retailer of Dr. Marten’s Made in England line for men and women.

Tower of wood no more
Willamette Week reported that the “deal to build a record-setting wooden Portland tower that was expected to be the tallest in North America is off.” It was going to be 12 stories tall and constructed from cross-laminated timber. Reason: the costs were too high.

  Source.
Source. 

Portland Building Leggings
It’s exactly what you think it is. Portland Design Events, the “premier website for finding and sharing architecture and design-related events in Portland, Oregon,” (and a favorite site of ours) also has a store where you can buy Portland design-inspired items. Like? Like these Portland Building leggings.

Headline of the week: CVS commits urban malpractice with generic store designs that poison neighborhoods
One, the Dallas Morning News has an architecture critic. That’s rad. How many daily newspaper have an architecture critic any more? (Thankfully we have Brian Libby’s Portland Architecture.) Two, this review takes apart a new Dallas CVS, piece by piece. Here’s a nice nugget:

The interior design is manipulative, but the exteriors are worse, for they actively encourage unhealthy behavior by abetting an auto-centric lifestyle and making the city actively worse for anyone who would prefer or requires other means of mobility, above all walking.

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Portland Real Estate

So long, Lotus Cafe; New brewery & drinking map in Central Eastside; Overland Warehouse retrofit

The Lotus is no more
Avert your eyes if you don’t want to see the destruction of The Lotus. The Oregonian reported that it originally opened in 1906 (!!) at the corner of Southwest Third Avenue and Salmon Street as the Hotel Albion. The building was known for the Lotus Café and Cardroom from 1924. It continued as a hopping nightspot until its closure in 2016. YouTuber Steve the Historian hustled down there and shot some video:

Mt. Hood Brewing opens its Central Eastside location this weekend
Snuggled at the foot of the Tilikum Bridge at a former TriMet transfer station (now called Bruun Dock Studios) we think the location will work for them. Even if they only got commuters hopping off the Orange Line for a quick pint and a pizza they’ll rock it. Another win for Central Eastside.

  Source, 

Speaking of the Central Eastside (and booze)
The folks at Conveyor have put together a micro-site of the history of the Central Eastside as well as a map of places to grab a drink. You can walk, hike, even bike it. (If you drive it, you won’t find parking. And if you’re drinking you shouldn’t be driving. Wags finger.) If you’re old school like me, look for hard copies of the map at selected establishments.

  Source. 

Adaptive reuse of the week: Overland Warehouse
Originally built as a warehouse in 1889, Overland Warehouse has served as temporary housing for immigrant families, a neighborhood market, and a nightclub over the years.

  Source. 
Source.

In 2016, UD+P completed a full renovation that preserved and restored its historic structural elements while adding modern features that are needed for today’s creative office tenants. Unique among older brick buildings in downtown Portland, Overland features a stunning atrium built into the third floor that brings light down to the center of the building.

As part of the renovation, the building underwent a complete seismic retrofit.

And, just last month Restore Oregon presented the Overland Warehouse design and development team with a 2018 DeMuro Award.

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Portland Real Estate

12 Portland skyscrapers that changed Portland; Small-scale manufacturing in Central Eastside; ‘Booming’ South Downtown Milwaukie

The word skyscraper might be a stretch, regardless, this piece goes deep (or is that high?) on 12 Portland skyscrapers that changed the city for good (and bad).  I don’t normally recommend reading the comments from OregonLive but there’s a lively discussion on buildings missed (of course there’s the old-timer lamenting how much downtown has changed since—fill in blank of the decade when they peaked/moved here). Great pics throughout, too. I love it when the Oregonian dives into its pic morgue. And for the record, where’s the Weatherly?

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Portland Small-Scale Manufacturing
White papers don’t exactly instill a sense of excitement but this one is pretty fascinating. It’s called The State of Urban Manufacturing Portland City Snapshot. Stay with me.

In a nutshell, the white paper helps to try and understand what the small-batch manufacturing sector looks like, who its “entrepreneurs and employees are, and what cities can do to help these firms thrive and grow into larger jobs generators, and retain them within the urban core.”

One of the cities that the The Urban Manufacturing Alliance profiled is Portland. And one of the key takeaways I got (and, sure, I’m cherry-picking) is that manufacturing job growth between 2010 and 2016 was most evident in the Central Eastside district, where it increased by 30 percent. I’m intrigued by small-scale manufacturing and how individuals and companies are making stuff, not outside of cities, but right in the middle in places like the Central Eastside.

The downside?

Affordable space represents the most urgent challenge facing manufacturers in Portland today, especially smaller, fast-growing companies that prefer to accommodate their expansions within city limits.

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Milwaukie has a lot going in South Downtown
And, they’ve got a new website to prove it. South Downtown wasn’t even a thing like 5 years ago. And now? Here’s some of what’s going to be completed (whoa?) by 2019-2020.

  • Axletree apartments, a new five-story, mixed-use development.
  • Kronberg Park Multi-Use Walkway
  • Coho Point at Kellogg Creek, an opportunity site for a 5-story mixed-use building.
  • A new high school
  • A new space for the Milwaukie Farmer’s Market

That’s just some of the projects.

 The future site of Coho Landing in South Downtown Milwaukie. The current building will be demolished.  Source. 
The future site of Coho Landing in South Downtown Milwaukie. The current building will be demolished. Source. 

Small-scale on Division
Took a stroll down Division in today (as I do every couple of years) and was— as usual—blown away by the changes. I like that these kind of workhouse buildings (see pic) are still around. Two-story, retail on bottom, housing on top. Could this even get built anymore? Does code even allow that?

 Small-scale still exists along Division (surrounded by new construction). 
Small-scale still exists along Division (surrounded by new construction). 
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Portland Real Estate

Guild Theatre gets new life; mid-century in Milwaukie; new pedestrian bridge in Forest Park

We’ve got to admit it was touch and go with the Guild. It was in disrepair for years, then vacant. (Buildings that are vacant for long periods of time always us nervous.) It was originally built in 1927 as the Taylor Street Theatre until 1948 when it was renamed, renovated in 1956, then closed in 2006. But wait! It was renovated in 2016. Original plans called for it to be used as a theater, but that came to pass. Until this year, it sat vacant. And now, Willamette Week reports that it will get a new resident—Japan’s Kinokuniya Books. Chalk that up as a win. 

  Source. 

Milwaukie Cleaners closing

Dry cleaners closing their doors isn’t exactly breaking news. However, this one piques our interest. One, it’s a cool structure. Two, it’s a hidden mid-century gem. Three, it would make a great spot for something other than a dry cleaner? Restaurant? Beer-something? Coffee shop? Market? The Architecture Heritage Center did a walking tour of downtown Milwaukie last year that (we think) that featured it. (They’re doing another one in the fall.)

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Beers Made by Walking and a new pedestrian bridge in Forest Park
If you’ve never done the Beers Made by Walking hike, do it. Last weekend, we had the chance to wander around with Forest Park folks and brewers from Hopworks and Reverend Nat’s Hard Cider. The two-hour walk provided a chance to see a new Metro trail under construction, a 500-year-old cedar, and a forest —mere miles from downtown Portland.

Closer to town on Burnside in Forest Park it was recently announced the Burnside Wildwood Trail crossing has enough funds to be built. After support from myriad of sources, including Portland Parks & Recreation, Metro, major family and public foundations, private donations, and crowdsourcing, construction is predicted to start in late summer.

 Based on a stunning design inspired by the concept of a “bridge floating in the woods” by Ed Carpenter, an artist from Portland.  Source. 
Based on a stunning design inspired by the concept of a “bridge floating in the woods” by Ed Carpenter, an artist from Portland. Source. 

 

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Portland Real Estate

Renovating on SE Grand, property for sale in Oak Grove, Willamette Falls back on track

Michael Andersen looks at Portland’s infamous 1924 rezoning legacy that launched a “century of exclusion.”  Great news! After a brief hiccup, the Willamette Falls riverwalk project is back on track. (Sorry—PBJ subscribers only.)

Park Avenue Max stop property for sale 

For sale across from the Park Avenue Max stop—four parcels for a total of 27,014 SF lot. The site also includes a 4,752 SF industrial-flex building. The property is “ideal for owner use or a redevelopment opportunity.” Source.

Down in Oak Grove at the last Max stop, a key piece of property has been listed for sale. The whole corner is ripe for development. On one side you have the station, across from that is Max parking, then a 7-Eleven. With a local organization (Oak Grove is unincorporated) working with the county to re-imagine the intersection (e.g., introducing code so more sprawl doesn’t get thrown up on McLoughlin) this might be a viable intersection someday.

Old 70s building gets new look
Lorentz Bruun Construction announced on its Instagram page that they’re in the process of renovating an old furniture store on Grand (716 SE Grand). Built in 1904, the brick-cladded building had a modern facade plopped on in 1979. The building is next to Dig a Pony and Kachka. Bruun recently adapted the Iron Fireman warehouse building (1721-1799 SE Schiller St.) in SE Portland (coming soon: Ruse Brewing) and are working on the new Central Eastside Mt. Hood Brewery location at OMSI.

 There's brick behind that 1970s facade.  Source.  
There’s brick behind that 1970s facade. Source.